International Zero-Emission Vehicle Alliance (ZEV Alliance)

General

Name of initiative International Zero-Emission Vehicle Alliance (ZEV Alliance)
LPAA initiative Yes
NAZCA Initiative Yes
Website address http://www.zevalliance.org/
Related initiatives
Starting year 2015
End year
Secretariat International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), 1225 I St NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC USA 20005, e-mail: secretariat@zevalliance.org
Organisational structure - Secretariat at the ICCT

- Funding from member governments and philanthropic foundations

Geographical coverage Global, Western Europe, North America
Name of lead organisation International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT)
Type of lead organisation Local government, National government
Location/Nationality of lead organisation United States of America

Description

Description The International Zero-Emission Vehicle Alliance (ZEV Alliance) is a collaboration of national and subnational governments working together to accelerate adoption of ZEVs. The participants set ambitious, achievable targets for ZEV deployment, take actions to achieve those targets as appropriate in each jurisdiction, act together to achieve individual and collective targets, and encourage and support other jurisdictions in setting and achieving ambitious ZEV targets.
Objectives ZEV Alliance members will:

- Establish a collective, headline target for ZEV leadership jurisdictions; - Encourage, set, and announce ambitious, realistic ZEV targets and plans in each jurisdiction, in line with its air quality, climate, and oil independence goals; - Work together on action plans to achieve ambitious ZEV targets; - Demonstrate the scale and momentum of ZEV adoption, and raise international awareness of expanding ZEV markets and opportunities.

Activities Outreach and coalition building:

• The participants will continue to set ambitious, achievable targets for ZEV deployment, take actions to achieve those targets as appropriate in each jurisdiction, act together to achieve individual and collective targets, and encourage and support other jurisdictions in setting and achieving ambitious ZEV targets. The governments meet regularly to support their ongoing policy and technology developments in the respective jurisdictions and direct new work to establish global best practices to support ZEVs. Capacity building: • The ZEV Alliance member governments have continued to meet on a monthly basis to collaborate on wide-ranging policy and technical questions related to ZEV consumer incentives, electric power utility practices, consumer awareness programs, zero-emission freight truck technologies, and charging infrastructure to best support ZEV deployment. The ZEV Alliance, with several prospective new member governments, met in person in Amsterdam in May 2017 to chart out its priorities, ongoing activities, and plans to continue the implementation of the ZEV Alliance’s commitments in 2017 and 2018. The ZEV Alliance also conducted two public webinars (on utility best practices, and consumer awareness campaigns to support ZEVs) to increase its outreach. Knowledge development: • The ICCT has prepared and published reports for the ZEV Alliance that summarize the ZEV Alliance exchange and the latest technology and policy research. The “Literature review of electric vehicle consumer awareness and outreach” summarizes leading global practices to educate and inform consumes of ZEVs. The report “Transitioning to zero-emission heavy-duty freight vehicles” assesses emission and cost implications of technologies to decarbonize heavy-duty freight trucks in China, Europe, and the U.S. The report “Emerging best practices for electric vehicle charging infrastructure,” analyzes electric vehicle charging infrastructure deployment practices, challenges, and emerging best practices in major electric vehicle markets around the world. Finally, the report “Developing hydrogen fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles: A status update” provides an update on the role of fuel cell vehicles and hydrogen infrastructure to help meet zero-emission vehicle goals. Policy-making and implementation: • The ZEV Alliance’s 14 governments have sustained and expanded many dozens of ZEV support policies throughout 2017, including new and continued ZEV consumer incentives, continued regulatory support for ZEV deployment, increased ZEV electric charging and hydrogen refueling infrastructure deployment, increased activities to promote electric power utility support for ZEVs, increased demonstration and planning activities to transition toward zero-emission freight trucks, and increased public ZEV public education and awareness campaigns.

One or two success stories achieved

Monitoring and Impacts

Sustainable Development Impact:
E SDG goals icons-individual-rgb-13.png  
Function of initiative Implementation, Technical dialogue, Political dialogue
Activity of initiative Goal setting (ex-ante), Knowledge dissemination and exchange, Knowledge production and innovation, Policy planning and recommendations
Indicators
Goal setting (ex-ante) — Total Mitigation
Year20302050
Value (MtCO2e/yr)1251500
Goals -Accelerate the adoption of zero-emission vehicles (electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles

-Governments announced that they will strive to make all passenger vehicles sales in their jurisdictions ZEVs by no later than 2050 and to collaboration on policies and actions to achieve their ZEV targets.

- Unlocks GHG reductions of over 125 million tons CO2 per year in 2030, and over 1.5 billion tons CO2 per year in 2050, in climate change mitigation when including lifecycle impact of electric vehicles

- Governments actively working on designing and assessing current electric vehicle policy instruments

-The governments meet regularly to support their ongoing policy and technology developments in the respective jurisdictions and direct new work to establish global best practices to support ZEVs.

- Recruitment of additional governments; established website to publicize activities

- Governments commission and guide research to improve electric vehicle policy, incentives, and infrastructure activities

Comments on indicators and goals
How will goals be achieved
Have you changed or strenghtened your goals
Progress towards the goals The ZEV Alliance member governments have continued to meet on a monthly basis to collaborate on wide-ranging policy and technical questions related to ZEV consumer incentives, electric power utility practices, and consumer awareness programs to best support ZEV deployment. The ZEV Alliance, with several prospective new member governments, met in person to chart out its priorities, ongoing activities, and plans to continue the implementation of the ZEV Alliance’s commitments in 2016 and

2017. The ZEV Alliance’s 14 governments have sustained and expanded many dozens of ZEV support policies throughout 2016, including new and continued ZEV consumer incentives, continued regulatory support for ZEV deployment, increased ZEV electric charging and hydrogen refueling infrastructure deployment, increased activities to promote electric power utility support for ZEVs, and increased public ZEV public education and awareness.

How are you tracking progress of your initiative Aggregate information from member jurisdictions; tracking global ZEV sales and technology
Available reporting The International Council on Clean Transportation has prepared and published reports for the ZEV Alliance, one titled, “Principles for effective electric vehicle incentive design.” It assesses the best practices in the design of electric vehicle incentives based on an analysis of these incentives across major markets in North America, Europe, and Asia. The most recent report is “Assessment of nextgeneration electric vehicle technologies,” analyzing vehicle models and the potential for lowered costs and increased production volume.

Participants

Participants Number Names
Members 14  
Companies 0
Business organisations 0
Research and educational organisations 0
Non-governmental organisations 0
National states 4 Germany,  The Netherlands,  Norway,  The United Kingdom
Governmental actors 0
Regional / state / county actors 10 British Columbia,  California,  Connecticut,  Maryland,  Massachusetts,  New York,  Oregon,  Québec,  Rhode Island,  Vermont
City / municipal actors 0
Intergovernmental organisations 0
Financial Institutions 0
Other members 0
Supporting partners 0
Number of members in the years
2018
14
Have only national states as participators No


Theme

Transport Agriculture Forestry Business Financial institutions Buildings Industry Waste Cities and subnational governments Short Term Pollutants International maritime transport Energy Supply Fluorinated gases Energy efficiency Renewable energy Supply chain emission reductions Adaptation Other Resilience Innovation Energy Access and Efficiency Private Finance
Yes No No No No No No No Yes No No No No No No No No No No No No No
Last update: 21 September 2018 09:43:56

Not only have national states as participators