CCAC: Phasing Down Climate Potent HFCs / HFCs Initiative

General

Name of initiative CCAC: Phasing Down Climate Potent HFCs / HFCs Initiative
LPAA initiative Yes
NAZCA Initiative Yes
Website address http://www.ccacoalition.org/en/initiatives/hfc
Related initiatives
Starting year
End year
Secretariat Denise Sioson, CCAC Secretariat, UNEP Paris, Phone:+33 144377637, E-mail:Denise.Sioson.Affiliate@unep.org
Organisational structure Particularly private sector-led initiatives Global Refrigerant Management Initiative (GRMI) and Global Food Cold Chain Council (GFCCC). The governance is run by independently by a body reporting to the CCAC on their projects and progress.
Geographical coverage Global
Functions of Initiative Implementation
Main activities Technical operational implementation
Side activities Knowledge dissemination and exchange
Name of lead organisation UNEP Paris
Type of lead organisation United Nations or Specialised agency
Location/Nationality of lead organisation France

Description

Description "Under the HFC Initiative, national governments, non-state entities and private sector companies aim to mobilize efforts of all the non-state actors and governments to reduce the projected growth in use and emission of HFCs through various activities."
Goals "Objective by COP22: Expanded membership of the Global Food Cold Chain Council program (numbers outlining growth to follow); Code of Practice for the servicing sector is finalized and shared through the global network of companies to promote refrigerant emissions reduction globally – To be launched at COP22.

Long-term Objective: Reduce high-GWP Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) emissions by 30 to 50% from refrigerant servicing within 10 years, and enhance energy efficiency and reduce food loss in the cold food chain."

Activities "Getting actors together to express support for an amendment to the Montreal Protocol as well as promote better public procurement procedures regarding this."

Monitoring and Impacts

Short and long-time objectives Objective by COP22: Expanded membership of the Global Food Cold Chain Council program (numbers outlining growth to follow); Code of Practice for the servicing sector is finalized and shared through the global network of companies to promote refrigerant emissions reduction globally – To be launched at COP22.

Long-term Objective: Reduce high-GWP Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) emissions by 30 to 50% from refrigerant servicing within 10 years, and enhance energy efficiency and reduce food loss in the cold food chain.

Roadmap and work plan For Global Food Cold Chain Council (GFCCC):

By COP 22: • Agreement with partners to carry out country case studies on food cold chain • Agreement to form broad coalition with UN implementing agencies • Agreement on framework for CCAC SAP to assess food cold chain expansion data

Beyond COP22: • Carry out country case studies on food cold chain • Establish operating plans and goals for broad coalition with UN implementing agencies • Complete CCAC SAP assessment of food cold chain expansion data • Establish working relationship with federal governments and intergovernmental bodies worldwide to promote food cold chain technologies in a way that benefits human health and the environment.

For Global Refrigerant Management Initiative (GRMI):

By COP22: • Continue AHRI Research: High Temperatures AREP, Industry/US Department of Energy Risk Assessment • Complete Survey of Training and Education Programs • Begin implementation of Memorandum of Understanding Re: Reclaimed HFC Credit Bank • Strengthen engagement with CCAC and broader climate policy community/build on COP21 presence • Explore Refrigerant Driving License synergies • Expand membership • Develop compendium of refrigerant management policies: mandatory certification and training, reclamation fees, licensing, etc. (2016-2017).

By 2020: • Complete survey of education and training programs and draft model program template • Advance certification concepts • Develop equipment standards • Begin generating subnational, national and international policy proposals, model laws • Host and participate in industry workshops • Develop a better understanding of challenges related to equipment supply • Develop monitoring and recordkeeping solutions • Explore solutions regarding chain of custody tracking/asset optimization • Develop and participation in existing regional organizations • Explore issues related to the availability of recovery equipment • Explore potential maintenance and repair standards • Regularly coordinate with UN implementing agencies.

By 2025: • **Achieve a 30-50 percent reduction in HFC emissions from refrigerant servicing • Begin implement of model training and education program template in countries with no programs previously. • Regularly share with public and private sector stakeholders GRMI-developed solutions regarding: certification concepts, equipment standards, equipment supply, monitoring and recordkeeping, chain of custody tracking/asset optimization, availability of recovery equipment, maintenance and repair standards • Regularly generate subnational, national and international policy proposals, model laws • Regularly participate in industry workshops • Normalize participation in existing regional organizations • Strengthen working relationship with UN implementing agencies.

By 2030: • Implement model training and education program template in (# or %) of countries with no programs previously • Establish GRMI as the go-to institution for training and education program capacity building • Establish GRMI as the go-to institution for the development of refrigerant management-related policies and laws

How are you tracking progress of your initiative Current tracking is qualitative and occurs informally during monthly teleconferences of the GRMI and GFCCC membership.
Progress that has been made by your initiative The private sector-led initiatives have contributed in demonstrating to the Parties to the Montreal Protocol that the industry is ready to phasedown HFCs and that an amendment to the Montreal Protocol would be welcomed by the business sector. We believe that the private sector played a major role in getting the Kigali Amendment through this month.

Specific progress below: GRMI: • A GRMI steering committee was formed and has convened numerous times since COP21. • A global survey of training and education programs was completed. GFCCC: • GFCCC released the results of a major study it commissioned with Deloitte that confirmed the climate benefits of an expansion of the food cold chain globally. • GFCCC co-produced and co-sponsored the November 2015 conference, “Advancing Ozone & Climate Protection Technologies & Policies: The Food Cold Chain,” in Montreal with CCAC, the US Environmental Protection Agency and Environment and Climate Change Canada. Over 100 representatives of country delegations and private sector entities were represented. • GFCCC briefed the US President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology on the potential climate benefits of an expanded food cold chain. It was the highest meeting to date in the president’s administration on the topic of food waste.

Tracking adaptation progress (quantitative)
Tracking mitigation progress (quantitative)
Tracking finance progress(quantitative)
Available reporting
One or two success stories achieved On October 15, 2016, the world reached an agreement to phase-down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). It is one of the most significant actions governments have ever taken to protect the climate. HFCs are highly potent greenhouse gases that have a global warming potential 1000’s of times that of carbon dioxide (CO2).

The Kigali Amendment represents a historic step in combatting climate change. Since 2012, Coalition partners which includes the private sector, have worked to support the HFC Amendment under the Montreal Protocol by promoting HFC alternative technologies through case studies and international conferences, supporting the development of HFC inventories and studies, conducting demonstration projects to validate climate-friendly alternatives and technologies, and building political support. Moreover, both state and non-state partners have invested huge efforts beyond the initiative projects to support the negotiations process. For example, the industry partners of the CCAC have co-financed technology and policy conferences on HFC alternatives since 2012, and have stressed over and over their support and readiness to phasedown high-GWP HFCs.

How to join your initiative

Participants

Participants Leading organisations:

Climate and Clean Air Coalition, International Climate Change Partnership; Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy, Global Refrigerant Management Initiative (GRMI) and Global Food Cold Chain Council (GFCCC), the Air-conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), ABRAVA, the Brazilian Association for HAC-R

Funders
Non-profit organisations
Business organisations
Members CCAC HFC Initiative: Initiative Partners: Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Cote d'Ivoire, Denmark, Dominican Republic, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Liberia, Maldives, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Peru, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States, ClimateWorks, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development (IGSD), International Climate Change Partnership (ICCP), International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Terre Policy Centre, UNDP, UN Environment, UNIDO, World Bank; Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), The Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy, ASHRAE, Australian Refrigeration Association, Centro Studi Galileo, CLASP, The Coca Cola Company, Chemours, European Partnership for Energy and the Environment (EPEE), Honeywell, Ingersoll Rand, North American Sustainable Refrigeration Council (NASRC), Refrigerants Australia, Refrigerants Naturally!, Shecco.

GRMI: ABRAVA (Brazil), AHRI (US), Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy (US), AREA (EU), AREMA (Australia), ASHRAE (global), CRAA (China), EPEE (EU), HRAI (Canada), JRAIA (Japan), KRAIA (ROK), Refrigerants Australia (Australia), UN Environment.

GFCCC: Carrier, Emerson, Danfoss, Lennox, Refrigerants Australia, Johnson Controls

Research and educational organisations
Governmental bodies/agencies
Sub-national organisations/entities
International organisations
Other organisations
Total participants
Participating national governments
Have only national states as participators No

Theme

Transport Agriculture Forestry Business Financial institutions Buildings Industry Waste Cities and subnational governments Short Term Pollutants International maritime transport Energy Supply Fluorinated gases Energy efficiency Renewable energy Supply chain emission reductions Adaptation Other Resilience Innovation Energy Access and Efficiency Private Finance
No No No No No No No No No No No No Yes No No No No No No No No No
Last update: 8 May 2017 08:10:36

Not only have national states as participators